FC2ブログ
The World's My Oyster, Which I with pen will open.

スポンサーサイト

  --, -- --:--
上記の広告は1ヶ月以上更新のないブログに表示されています。
新しい記事を書く事で広告が消せます。
  •   --, -- --:--

7.460-544 Pharsalus

  12, 2017 22:54

PharsalusMap.jpg  


460, 1, 3, 2a || 2b-6 (Housman & Dilke)
When (the soldiers), by rapid running, traversed the land which delays the last moment of the fate, divided by the small land, they saw onto whom their javelins would fall and with whose hand the fate would threaten them thence (=from the opponent front-line). || So that they would be able to recognise what atrocities they were about to commit, they saw their fathers' faces and their brothers' arms at their hands at the opponent front-line; but it was not pleasing for them to move their places.


460, 1, 3, 2a || 2b-6 (SB)
When (the soldiers), by rapid running, traversed the land which delays the last moment of the fate, divided by the small land, they saw onto whom their javelins would fall and which hands would threaten them with the fate (=death) thence (=from the opponent front-line). || So that they would be able to recognise, within the line, what atrocities they were about to commit, they saw their fathers and their brothers' arms at their hands at the opponent front-line; but it was not pleasing for them to move their places.


460-4a || 4b-6 (Haskins)
When (the soldiers), by rapid running, traversed the land which delays the last moment of the fate, divided by the small land, then they saw (their foemen's) hands and saught to recognise their faces, to see onto whom their javelins would fall or which javelin would threaten them with the fate (=death), and what atrocities they were about to commit. || They saw their fathers and their brothers' arms at their hands at the opponent front-line; but it was not pleasing for them to move their places.


466b-9
However, stupefaction tied up all (people's) heart, and icy blood, as their piety was striken, congeal in their entrails; so all the soldiers, with their upper arms stretched, kept their prepared javelins for a long time.


470-5a
May Gods, give you, Crastinus, not only the death, which is prepared to all as a punishment, but also the sense after the fate to your death; for the javelin hurled by your hand began the battle and first stained Thessaly with the Roman blood. O what a headlong frenzy! While Caesar was holding his weapons, could any hand be found (guilty) beforehand? 


475b-84
Then (there were) the rattiling air broken out from the military trumpets, the military signal made conceived from the horn; then the daring tubes gave the sign of war; then the noise (of soldiers) extends to the upper-air and bursts into the vault of the furthest Olympus, from which the clouds are far and to which no thunders last (=reach). Haemus received the shout in its resounding valleys and gave it to the caves of Pelion to repeat (it) again; Pindus makes roaring, Pangaean rocks rebound it, the cliffs of Oeta groan, and so the soldiers has got frientened by the sound of their own madness re-echoed from all the earth.

*477 [variants] aethera tendit / tundit (SB):
 (i) aethera acc. of mortion; (ii) 'beat the upper-air'


485-8
Uncountable javelins were scattered with different vows; some wished to injure, while others wanted their javelins to pierce into the ground and to keep their hands pure. (But) chance snatches everything (=rules supreme) and uncertain fortune makes guilty those whom she wants to.


----- hence following the verse order of no modern edition but the Haskins' -----


489-91
But how much (=how small) part of the destruction was exacted (*as penalty) by the thrown and flying irons (=pila)! (But) only a sword suffices the hatred of the civics and leads their hands into entrails of Romans.


492-5
Pompey’s battle line, compressed in dense crowds, had joined their arms in line, with their shields' bosses tied, had stood together, being scarcely able to have a place for moving their hands and javelins, and. being compressed, was afraid of their own swords.


496-8a
Caesar's mad army, with headlong speed, was driven (=charged) against the dense wedge-shaped (formation of Pompeians) and sought their way through arms and foes.


501b-3
One army suffered the civil war, while the other army waged it; on one side the sword remained cold, while all the guilty swords of Caesarians were hot.


504-5 (Housman, Dilke, Postgate, Haskins)
And Fortune, changing *so many weights of affairs (=overthrowing the balance of weight in favour of Caesar) *for not a long time (=not taking long; in a short time), swept away the enormous ruins with rushing fate (=flood of doom).
*tot pondera *non (of nec) diu vertens


504-5 (Hudson-Williams [1954], [1957] )
"And Fortune, *inclining *the balance of *so many issues (towards Caesar's side) *for not a long time but swept away the mighty ruins in the torrent of doom."
*vergens *pondera *rerum tot *non (of nec) diu vertens


506-9
As soon as Pompeian’s cavalry distributed its wings in the whole plane and spread along the farthest part of the battle (=the extreme right and left of Caesar’s army), the scattered light-armed soldiers proceeded along the farthest troops (=the extreme right and left of Pompey’s army) and launched fierce attacks against the foe (=Caesar’s army).


521-4
As Caesar, fearing that his front might be shaken by the attack, kept (some) cohorts at an angle behind the standards and into the side of the battle line, where the enemy in disorder was advancing, he sent them out suddenly, without moving his wings.


525-7
Those who were forgetful of the battle, with no shame of fearing, made (it) clear, fleeing headlong, that the civil war (could) never be committed well by barbaric troops.


528-31
As soon as a horse, pierced in its chest by a sword, trampled the limbs of its rider, who was thrown out headlong (from the horse), every horseman withdrew from the plain and, with their bridles turned, they, as a close-packed cloud, hurried headlong into their own ranks.


532-5a
Thence the slaughter lost its limit and no fight was followed, but the battle was waged, by throats on one side and by swords on the other; nor the army (=Caesar's) was not able to lay low so many hosts that could die there.


スポンサーサイト
  •   12, 2017 22:54
  •  0

COMMENT - 0

Post a comment

上記広告は1ヶ月以上更新のないブログに表示されています。新しい記事を書くことで広告を消せます。